Woodruff - Early settler and farming finds

Procyon

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Have been finding relics on our own private property for 30+ years. Just started hunting with a basic detector within the last few years and have uncovered a plethora of what appear to be early settler and farming remnants.
Making me more interested in the history of the area around Woodruff.

I also just discovered a large section where all the rocks are “hot rocks” and really make the detector scream even if most low grade metals are discriminated (maybe not the right terminology)

Had always thought these rocks were brought in for erosion control as they are very rounded and smooth but think now it may be a large hematite deposit. The rocks can be found a foot or maybe more underground and range in size from 150lb to ounces. Brown, orange oxide type layer outside and matte to shiny black inside.

Anyone have any history on the old iron belt of upstate SC from 18th to 19th century they could share?

Some of the iron or steel implements I find are 10” or more below ground making me think the history of the area is much older than I originally thought.

Check out some of the finds! More to come.
 

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Welcome from CT. Thanks for sharing your finds. Looking forward to seeing more.
 
Welcome from N. Michigan. I'm curious, is the wedge piece for splitting wood or large rocks or stone. Very cool.
 
Thanks for the welcome. I’m in upstate SC. Property has very old terraces on the hillsides that now have 150+ year hardwoods. Multiple old stone foundation and fireplace remnants. The last story I heard was it was used for cotton farming but not sure on that.

Whatever the felling wedge was used for based on its mushroomed end someone spent considerable time wailing on it. The pointed end seems in fairly good shape so I would assume it was used for wood.

Also what appears to be an old spring fed bathing hole with a man made rock wall.
 

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I would check in with the South Carolina Geological Survey, a Division of the Department of Natural Resources. They are on the North side of Columbia, SC. Let me know how you make out. It's interesting. You are also up in the historic Southern Appalachian gold belt country. Side note - The Southern miners taught the Coloradoans how to find gold in Colorado.
 
I have checked into this before and what they provide was very basic at best and probably not accurate. There is a fairly decent sized fault line running through the area. Some large outcroppings of granite and sandstone also. The main creek running through has a large amount of quartz, mica and black sand. I have panned in many places and have never found traces of gold.

It is interesting that the stones that I assume are hematite only appear in only one small centralized location (Maybe 2-3 acres). Elsewhere the rocks give no metal signal at all or only small spots on very large 500 +lb boulders. There are 4 or 5 springs on the property.

At the moment I take my boys on "treasure hunting" trips around the property. Really a lot of fun watching them get excited when we make a find. Will be posting as we go.
 
I have checked into this before and what they provide was very basic at best and probably not accurate. There is a fairly decent sized fault line running through the area. Some large outcroppings of granite and sandstone also. The main creek running through has a large amount of quartz, mica and black sand. I have panned in many places and have never found traces of gold.

It is interesting that the stones that I assume are hematite only appear in only one small centralized location (Maybe 2-3 acres). Elsewhere the rocks give no metal signal at all or only small spots on very large 500 +lb boulders. There are 4 or 5 springs on the property.

At the moment I take my boys on "treasure hunting" trips around the property. Really a lot of fun watching them get excited when we make a find. Will be posting as we go.
You may be able to take a specimen and your photos to them and they may be able to ID the mineralogy for you and make other suggestions and observations. Really, it should be a part of their job, just based on my own experiences.
 
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