Any ideas on this one?

CTpilgrim

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Location
Southern Connecticut
I’m new to bottle hunting but after doing it a few times I’m definitely hooked. I’ve been hitting the inside of a cellar hole that people were using as a dump site for many years. Most of the stuff is broken but I have managed a few whole ones. I found this the other day and although I don’t know exactly what it is I really like it. I’m thinking late 1800’s-early 1900’s fruit or olive container? It does have a seam that runs out near the neck so I’m pretty sure it was hand finished. The other picture is of some of the other bottles that came from this spot. I also found an early sanfords ink well that like an idiot I broke while cleaning. Thanks for the help
 

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There's a few glass experts here who probably know it. But all I can say is that long one is awesome!
 
Really cool finds you have there. It's funny when I first started detecting, I would see people posting about going creek walking and finding all these old bottles and I was thinking why are people collecting old dirty bottles for. Then one day while digging a target I pulled out late 20s coca cola bottle and a medicine bottle and thought this is pretty cool where can I find one of those bottle dumps people are talking about. It hooks you in.
 
Pretty sure the long one is a pickle jar (for pickling), and I think your spot on with the time range (possibly slightly later 1910-1920). Just my opinion, nice digs!
 
As others said the long bottle is probably an olive or pickle bottle. Those others look to me like all are 1910 or earlier, due to their crudeness. You're in a good age for nice glass. I'd probe out that whole area and see what you have.
 
The only thing throwing me off is the seam on the lip, running horizontally. You see these on later milk and creamer bottles as well. The seam running vertically seems to stop at the shoulder, which would put it right in your timeframe. I'd definitely be poking around some more, usually these dumps were used for decades, so digging deeper usually yields older glass. Please keep us posted on your finds, and good luck out there!
 
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